TCM Director Of The Month: Raoul Walsh

TCM – Friday 7 August, from 8.30pm

As one of Hollywood’s most prolific and long-standing film-directors, Raoul Walsh is best known for the no-nonsense celluloid action ranging from cowboy Westerns to gangster Crime films. He began as an actor in 1909 in westerns made by the Pathe brothers, and signed with D.W. Griffith in 1912, appearing as the young Pancho Villa in Christy Cabanne’s The Life of General Villa (1914) and as John Wilkes Booth in Griffith’s infamous classic The Birth of a Nation (1915). From acting to directing, the next 20 years saw Walsh taking on small short-reels to feature-length work at Twentieth Century Fox and Paramount which while genial, but lacked his distinctive grit that he is best remembered for. This period, though, does include the likeably rowdy comedies Me and My Gal (1932) and Sailor’s Luck (1933), the lusty brawling of The Bowery (1933) and Under Pressure (1935). A recognizable style and recurrent thematic interests were beginning to emerge in Walsh’s work.

THE MEN WHO MADE THE MOVIES: RAOUL WALSH (1973)

HIGH SIERRA (1941)

THE STRAWBERRY BLONDE (1941)

GENTLEMAN JIM (1942)

ONE SUNDAY AFTERNOON (1948)

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