Freeview breaks 50% penetration mark

This is more good news for Freeview in light of the forthcoming Digital Switch Over.

New figures show more than half of all New Zealand households with a working TV now use at least one Freeview device for their television viewing.

The government’s latest digital tracker survey shows the number of households using Freeview increased from 48% to 52% in the last three months to the end of January.

Freeview General Manager Sam Irvine says the upswing in the number of Freeview households bodes well for the future of free TV and Freeview’s own research suggests that 80% of the remaining analogue homes will make the change to Freeview during the digital switch over.

“Switchover is now just months away for most households.  People are weighing up their options and realising they can continue to watch their favourite shows without having to pay an ongoing subscription for Digital TV.”

“100% of New Zealand’s top 20 shows are available from free to air channels and this result shows just how important free TV remains for entertainment in New Zealand homes,” Mr Irvine says.

The growth in the number of Freeview homes reflects record sales for the platform over the past year, during which over half a million Freeview approved digital TV devices were sold throughout the country and the fact that all Televisions will need to be Digital after the switch over.

“Sales were up for all categories of Freeview approved products with MyFreeview recorders showing the biggest increase in sales, up 96 percent from the previous year.  We expect demand to be even stronger this year as the remainder of New Zealand starts going digital only from the end of April.”

“Freeview has the content that people like to watch, and MyFreeview is the equipment that lets them enjoy it on their terms,” Mr Irvine says.

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Regan is one of the co-founders of Throng Media.
If they're on, I'm usually watching Game of Thrones, The Walking Dead, 24, Battlestar Galactica, The X Factor, Survivor, House of Cards, Mad Men and the NRL.
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