Castaway

Castaway
Tuesday 4 September, 9.30pm

‘Castaway’ wraps up tonight, starting at 9.30pm on TV ONE. The initial eviction sees several castaways sent home, while the remaining group reflect on what it is about their island home they appreciate the most. With just five castaways left, presenter Danny Wallace explains that the final day will see individuals cast off one by one until only the winner remains.

Castaway
Tuesday 4 September, 9.30pm

‘Castaway’ wraps up tonight, starting at 9.30pm on TV ONE. The initial eviction sees several castaways sent home, while the remaining group reflect on what it is about their island home they appreciate the most. With just five castaways left, presenter Danny Wallace explains that the final day will see individuals cast off one by one until only the winner remains.

Castaway Tuesday 12 June, 9.30pm

Seven years on from the original, ‘Castaway’ returns with a new shape and new twists but the same underlying intentions: take a group of people as far away from their current lives as possible – geographically, psychologically, and emotionally – to explore what’s really important to them and discover how they shape their community (tonight at 9.30pm on TV ONE). The series is presented by Danny Wallace and filmed on New Zealand’s Great Barrier Island.

The people who have been chosen to be castaways reflect many aspects of British life: there is a variety of ages, backgrounds, skills and personalities. But they all have something to offer and strong reasons for wanting to be a castaway. The castaways will spend three months in a remote area of Great Barrier Island, cut off from the world and forced to fend for themselves. The setting is sandy beaches surrounded by the deep blue ocean, green hills and winding streams – the castaways arrived at the end of summer, with the sun shining for 13 hours a day, and temperatures ranging from 15 to 27 degrees Celsius. They also arrived not knowing where or how far away from civilisation they are.
Peter Fincham, a controller at BBC ONE, says he was excited to see ‘Castaway’ return: “‘Castaway’ was the original reality show and the genre has evolved enormously since then. The new series will be reflecting this evolution. However, the original purpose, to see how people react once they are taken far away from all that they take for granted remains the same and I will be fascinated to see how our castaways get on.”

During this unique experience they will explore the best ways to live in close quarters with people that they may not initially seem to have much in common with, draw on personal skills – or discover new ones – to develop the infrastructure of their isolated location and, in the process, discover more about themselves as individuals. The castaways range in age from 19 to 64 years old and receive no money for taking part in the show.

BBC Commissioning Editor Elaine Bedell says there is a great mix of personalities and backgrounds from around the UK. “They each have their own reason for wanting to undertake this unique experience and we hope that they will all achieve some personal goal or discovery along the way. It’s a chance for us all to reflect on what is important to us once the daily commute, the school run and our hectic modern schedule are stripped away.”

‘Castaway’ tonight sees the initial group of 13 castaways arrive on the island.

The 13 castaways are:

* Joe Chicken, 33, an occupational therapist from Kent.
* Alister Cooling (known as Al), 24, an unemployed writer from Leeds.
* Clare Hilley, 22, a student pilot from Surrey.
* Erica Hurst, 22, a lap dancer from Bolton.
* Alasdair Humberston, 19, a psychology student and director of his own web design company, from Northamptonshire.
* Lucinda King, 27, an event project manager originally from Hampshire, now lives in London.
* Hassan Kobeissi, 24, a labourer from Suffolk.
* Wendie Mitchell, 42, a carer and counselling student from London.
* Kenneth Rose, 64, a photographer from Essex.
* Jason Ross, 37, currently unemployed and from Kent.
* Jonathan Shearer, 41, a walks and education officer from Scotland.
* Francie Smee, 56, an administrator from Oxford.
* Gemma Zinyama, 22, a sales executive from Essex.

13 British castaways have arrived on their “shipwrecked” island in New Zealand and begun the long 12 week rush to build shelter, gather food, and start surviving. The BBC Reality tv show this time around includes a lap dancer, a young conservative, a former drug addict, and a professional psychic.

This episode is the newest adventure of a popular reality tv series that started off with scandal as contestants spent a full year on an island in the Hebrides. This New Zealand edition is not without its own scandals already, as Government run conservation land is being “sold” to the British TV network for the purposes of filming and regular land-users, including walkers, daytrippers, fisherfolk, and locals have been told they will not have access to the area of the island being used as the set.

Apparently after 8 weeks a special contest will be run where a viewer will be able to win the opportunity to join the castaways on the island partway through their adventure.

Want to read more?? Click here!!

Given that castaway 2007 is set on the Great Barrier Island (GBI), will we see yet another survivor rip off on TVNZ?

Will Julie Christie be mad that she never thought of it first?

Will GBI Residents get mad over the rubbish that will be left behind?

Or is that just NZers with Fijian homes?

Will any of the Castaways swim to the Coromandel and stay there?

Or try and claim land as their own?

Will Immigration give any of them residency?

Or Emergency Benefits?

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Castaway 2007

Seven years on from the Taransay original, Castaway returns for a new series on the BBC. No word yet on a NZ air date, but it is expected to be picked up as the show is being filmed on Great Barrier Island.

Throughout the week, the BBC will get daily updates as the castaways settle into their new life in New Zealand, revealing just what’s been happening during the previous 24 hours.

The network features unseen footage and discussion about the latest goings-on in this studio-based show and viewers can also offer their thoughts on the action by phone, email and text.

In addition, there is another BBC show which follows the weekly show that takes a closer look at events, with analysis on the group dynamics and the latest gossip from the island.

It features the Castaways’ family and friends, who give their own opinions on what their loved ones are getting up to on the island, how they feel they’re integrating into the group, and how they’re being treated by their fellow islanders.

Not sure if you remember the British TV show Castaway back in 2000 but it was pretty full on: put people on a remote island for a whole year.

Just like before, the new programme will feature people going to live as a community in a remote destination but with some new twists in the social experiment. This time round the programmes will be live and they will be coming from a new, exotic location.

The castaways will explore the best ways to live in close quarters with people that they may not have much in common with, draw on personal skills to develop the infrastructure of the island and, in the process, discover more about themselves as individuals.

The original series of Castaway began broadcasting on BBC ONE in January 2000, six months before Big Brother first appeared on Channel 4. The series was a ratings hit, with viewing figures peaking at 7-8 million. Seven people left during the course of the year.

Thirty six people went to spend a year living on the Scottish island of Taransay, building their own shelters and fending for themselves in a community. This time, the location will be on the other side of the world in order to take the Castaways even further from their current lives.

The second series of the BBC reality TV show Castaway is to return with volunteers living for a year on a remote part of New Zealand – most likely Great Barrier Island – instead of Scotland.

Filming will start in February.