Dog Squad

Despite Campbell Live’s average audience from last night’s show dropping from Monday’s high, a respectable 309,460 viewers tuned in for the show. While those numbers are definitely better than they’ve been, what TV3 will be happy about is the minimal loss of lead in into The Bachelor NZ which enjoyed an average audience of 306,550 viewers.

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8:00pm Tuesday, August 28 on TV One

TV ONE brings you an exciting new season of Kiwi favourite, Dog Squad.

Meet the dog handler teams from the police Delta dog team, the Corrections Service and the Department of Conservation, and witness the intimate relationships between the loyal canines and their masters.

Watch as these hardworking dog teams track down offenders, sniff out drugs and locate animal or vegetable matter that could have a devastating effect on New Zealand’s wildlife and growing industries.

Missed Dog Squad? Full episodes are available online. Go to www.tvnz.co.nz and click ‘on demand’.

8:00pm Monday, August 15 on TV One

The insider’s look at life on the line for some of the country’s hardest working canines continues tonight on TV ONE.

In this episode, a visitor is caught in the act dropping off drugs outside Hawke’s Bay Prison; drug dog Luke indicates the presence of drugs an Auckland apartment building; and a class C drug called Khat is intercepted at the international mail centre.

Missed an episode of Dog Squad? Full episodes are available on line. Go to www.tvnz.co.nz and click ‘on demand’.

8:00pm Monday, August 1 on TV One

The insider’s look at life on the line for some of the country’s hardest working canines continues tonight on TV ONE.

Corrections drug dog Flash detects the drug “P” on a prison visitor; MAF dogs pick up on a run of amateur taxidermy; and Aviation Security dogs are called in when some heavy metallers play up.

Missed an episode of Dog Squad? Full episodes are available on demand. Go to www.tvnz.co.nz and click ‘on demand’.

8:00pm Monday, July 25 on TV One

Returning tonight to TV ONE, a brand new series of Dog Squad, the insider’s look at some of the country’s hardest working canines and their two-legged colleagues as they play on the frontline, protecting our streets, prisons, national parks, airports and borders.

Viewers are right in with the action following the real-life scenarios that unfold as a result of these dedicated hardworking dogs in the Correction Service, Customs, MAF, Aviation Security, Department of Conservation, and Search and Rescue.

Undergoing hours and hours of training, the fruits of these trusty canines’ natural instincts and hard work are revealed as we see them sniffing out drugs, locating banned food and animal imports, and searching out survivors buried by the Christchurch earthquake.

Some of the top dogs starring in the new series include:

Ted, an appealing 5-year-old German short haired pointer who works alongside Waikeria Corrections dog handler Maurice. A favourite in the first series of Dog Squad, Ted’s highly sensitive nose has the ability to pick up on even the slightest of scents.

Flash and Ben are two of the countries 12 drug dogs working for the Department of Corrections. In partnership with handlers Carol and Steve, Flash and Ben help locate and detect illegal substances before they enter Auckland’s urban prisons.

Rowdy is a drug dog who works for Customs. Rowdy migrated from across the Tasman where his life began in the Australian Customs breeding programme. In New Zealand, Rowdy has been matched up with handler Daniel, where he has taken to detecting narcotic and precursor odors like a natural.

Archie is a sprightly Border collie who works along side his Aviation Security handler Andy. More than 360 hours and thousands of dollars have gone into training Archie to sniff out explosives that could pose local terrorism threats.

Another familiar face is MAF detector dog Watchman, from the first series of Dog Squad. Watchman first began his career working alongside handler Liz detecting fruit, vegetables and meat at airport arrivals halls. He proved to be so effective that his biosecurity repertoire has since been extended to detect live animals, including birds and reptiles. Watchman has also demonstrated a particular skill with airscenting, where he’s able to detect a potential biosecurity threat in the wind as it blows it through arrivals halls

Then there’s Jay, an expert detector dog who was rescued off death row at a Wellington vet clinic. While Jay wasn’t taken onto the MAF program for his looks, he more than proves his worth to his handler Kevin on a daily basis.

Missed an episode of Dog Squad? Full episodes are available online. Go to tvnz.co.nz and click the ‘Ondemand’ button.

Last week saw growth week on week and year on year for TV ONE and TV2, as highlighted in the top “week in review” stories on TVNZ’s business marketing site tvnzplanit.co.nz.

TV ONE’s Dog Squad grew audiences week on week and year on year for all people aged 25-54 (AP25-54), up almost four ratings points on the slot’s previous four weeks, and up over two ratings points against TV3 in the same timeslot.

The Zoo and Sunday also outperformed the previous four weeks, up week on week for AP25-54, and significantly beating TV3 for Sunday night.

On TV2 the big shows kept pulling in the big audiences. Grey’s Anatomy scored 19.6 target audience ratings points (TARPs) against household shoppers with kids 0-14 (HHS w/kids 0-14), up almost 2 ratings points on the previous four weeks, and almost double the ratings of TV3’s House.

Sister show Private Practice also had a stellar week, with week on week and year on year growth in all three key demos: AP18-39, HHS w/kids 0-14 and TV3’s target demo AP18-49.

The Big Bang Theory had a double-whammy, growing audiences week on week and year on year across both its Wednesday night and Friday night timeslots in all key demographics.

 

7:30pm Monday, January 25 on TV One

New, local series Dog Squad follows the integral role of working dogs and their handlers, as they play on the frontline protecting New Zealand’s streets, prisons, mountains, airports and borders (tonight on TV ONE at 7.30pm).

The series shows the action, following the real scenarios that unfold as a result of these dedicated hard-working dogs, in the Correction Service, Police, Aviation Security, Customs, MAF and Search and Rescue. While examining the relationship between the loyal canines and their handlers, viewers get an insight into the bond each duo have, and each dog’s unique style of operating.

For narcotics detector dog handler Maurice O’Connor, the partnership he shares with his dog, ‘Officer Ted’, is the best part of the job: “He doesn’t argue with you, he does what he’s told, when he’s told, he’s loyal and he’s always happy to see you,” he says.

The results of hours and hours of training undergone by these trusty canines is best seen when they sniff out drugs, track down criminals, and locate animal or vegetable matter that could be potentially devastating to New Zealand’s wildlife.

Although the series is full of twists and turns, it’s the unexpected finds that are most pleasing for the dog handler teams. “The interesting stories behind some of the smaller finds, which prove the dog is working really hard, were a highlight for me. As well as the interesting explanations people try and give when they’re caught with contraband,” says O’Connor.

O’Connor is one of the key handlers in the series and is dedicated to the cause: “I decided to be part of the series because we wanted to show good PR for the Department of Corrections, and to show the importance of the role of detector-dog teams in this environment,” he says.

Episode one sees corrections dog ‘Ted’ zero in on a prison visitor with a dubious carload of gear; the Police Delta Dog squad are called to an all out street brawl; and Search and Rescue dig for bodies in the snow.