HomeSick

1

9 June

Monday 9 June, 7.30pm

Must-see local series, HomeSick, takes a trip south and visits the Wallace family of Palmerston North, tonight on TV2. The Wallace family have lived in their rundown, 1930s Californian Bungalow home for seven years.

They know the house’s poor insulation and heating, plus rising damp from the storm water drains going into sumps under house, are causing problems for 5-year-old Summer, and Jordon, 9, who both suffer from asthma and constant chest infections. But until the HomeSick team arrive, they are unaware of the full impact the house is having on the whole family.
Dad Darren Wallace says managing winter is particularly hard with the children’s conditions. Summer’s attacks can be severe and last winter she ended up on steroids several times. “There’s nothing worse than hearing your little girl crying and panicking because she can’t breathe,” he says.

His wife Penelope also suffers from diabetes and asthma. She thought she had seen the end of the asthma while living in the Hawkes Bay for five years, but when she moved back Palmerston North it flared up again.

“Colds and flu are always an issue with someone during the winter. I don’t suffer so much, I think it’s my Scottish blood, but it is very stressful having to watch the rest of the family suffer.”

Every day of the year, thousands of ordinary New Zealanders, like the Wallace’s, are succumbing to a silent killer – and it’s one on which Kiwi’s have spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on – their homes.

On HomeSick tonight, the Wallace’s house will be investigated by a team of experts – a GP, a leading environmentalist, a builder and an interior designer. After hearing from the family about how they believe their health and happiness have been affected by the property, the HomeSick team move in to conduct the practical and scientific investigations.

Be watching TV2’s HomeSick as they unearth more than just the problems with the children, they discover a link between the mother’s worsening diabetes and the family’s Palmerston North home.

Monday 12 May, 7.30pm

A Swanson family is given the home makeover of their dreams tonight on TV2’s HomeSick.

Catherine Liotapumanaia lives with her husband Reginald and their three children. Their home is more than 100-years-old, it has no insulation, and is cold and damp. Water pools underneath the house because of poor drainage. It is also poorly heated and badly ventilated. All these factors contribute to the ill heath of the family, who all frequently suffer from colds and the flu. Nine-year-old Kristian has severe asthma and allergies. Six-year-old Caitlin has allergies while 11-year-old Armani has frequent tummy bugs and viral infections.
Glen Sims, the producer of HomeSick, explains that every New Zealander can relate to Catherine and Reg’s story; an average New Zealand family forced into crisis by the place that was meant to be their dream home.

“The Liotapumanaias story is a one that will resonate with almost every New Zealander living in an older home,” says Sims. “Their beautiful colonial villa was the family’s dream home, but it had also forced them into a position of financial hardship when Catherine had to give up her career to look after children made sick by the place they called home.”

Sims explains that New Zealanders need to understand exactly how their homes could be impacting on their health and well being – especially the vulnerable like children and the elderly.

“Whilst some of the renovations carried out in HomeSick are on a grand scale,” says Sims “the series contains a huge wealth of information for viewers about how small changes can make a big difference to their health and well being. For instance, a roll of draft exclusion tape, which costs just a few dollars from the local DIY shop, put around drafty windows and doors can significantly reduce heat loss and drafts.”

The World Health Organisation recommends a minimum indoor temperature of 18 degrees Celsius for good health. A huge percentage of homes in New Zealand fail to meet this minimum temperature even at the height of summer and the inevitable consequence is a fear of the colder months and unacceptable levels of illness – most of which can be directly attributable to the places we call home.

Sims says this problem can be easy to over come – and it’s simpler than many people think: “Under floor and roof insulation can reduce heat loss by up to 50 percent. Many New Zealanders are unaware that councils offer subsidies for insulation.”

New Zealand has one of the highest rates of Asthma in the OECD and as Sims says “We only have to look inside our homes for the reason why. House Dust Mites and toxic moulds are the leading causes of asthma in children – caused by poor ventilation, lack of insulation, choices of heating etc. For too long we’ve just accepted that this is the way it has to be… but HomeSick is hoping to let people know that small changes can make a big difference.”

Can the HomeSick experts help Catherine and her family? Be watching HomeSick on TV2 Monday 12 May at 7.30pm.

Monday 12 May, 7.30pm

A Swanson family is given the home makeover of their dreams tonight on TV2’s HomeSick.

Catherine Liotapumanaia lives with her husband Reginald and their three children. Their home is more than 100-years-old, it has no insulation, and is cold and damp. Water pools underneath the house because of poor drainage. It is also poorly heated and badly ventilated. All these factors contribute to the ill heath of the family, who all frequently suffer from colds and the flu. Nine-year-old Kristian has severe asthma and allergies. Six-year-old Caitlin has allergies while 11-year-old Armani has frequent tummy bugs and viral infections.
Glen Sims, the producer of HomeSick, explains that every New Zealander can relate to Catherine and Reg’s story; an average New Zealand family forced into crisis by the place that was meant to be their dream home.

“The Liotapumanaias story is a one that will resonate with almost every New Zealander living in an older home,” says Sims. “Their beautiful colonial villa was the family’s dream home, but it had also forced them into a position of financial hardship when Catherine had to give up her career to look after children made sick by the place they called home.”

Sims explains that New Zealanders need to understand exactly how their homes could be impacting on their health and well being – especially the vulnerable like children and the elderly.

“Whilst some of the renovations carried out in HomeSick are on a grand scale,” says Sims “the series contains a huge wealth of information for viewers about how small changes can make a big difference to their health and well being. For instance, a roll of draft exclusion tape, which costs just a few dollars from the local DIY shop, put around drafty windows and doors can significantly reduce heat loss and drafts.”

The World Health Organisation recommends a minimum indoor temperature of 18 degrees Celsius for good health. A huge percentage of homes in New Zealand fail to meet this minimum temperature even at the height of summer and the inevitable consequence is a fear of the colder months and unacceptable levels of illness – most of which can be directly attributable to the places we call home.

Sims says this problem can be easy to over come – and it’s simpler than many people think: “Under floor and roof insulation can reduce heat loss by up to 50 percent. Many New Zealanders are unaware that councils offer subsidies for insulation.”

New Zealand has one of the highest rates of Asthma in the OECD and as Sims says “We only have to look inside our homes for the reason why. House Dust Mites and toxic moulds are the leading causes of asthma in children – caused by poor ventilation, lack of insulation, choices of heating etc. For too long we’ve just accepted that this is the way it has to be… but HomeSick is hoping to let people know that small changes can make a big difference.”

Can the HomeSick experts help Catherine and her family? Be watching HomeSick on TV2 Monday 12 May at 7.30pm.

The Escobar family’s lives are thrown into turmoil when the HomeSick experts reveal that the children have been exposed to a potentially lethal problem for over a year.

HomeSick 7.30pm TV2

www.homesick.tv