Hotel Inspector

9:30pm Saturday, August 4 on TV One

The feared Hotel Inspector Alex Polizzi is back in a new season.

Award-winning hotelier Alex resumes her quest to salvage some of Britain’s worst-run hotels and bed-and-breakfast establishments. Alex has all the industry experience and authority needed to turn flagging hotels into profitable ventures.

Tonight, Alex faces up to one of her biggest challenges yet – in the shape of seventy-nine-year-old, eccentric hotel owner Terry Connor.

Terry and his wife have run the Milton Lodge for 23 years. But as the couple approach the autumn of their years, the spring has gone out of their step and they fear for their financial future.

Alex finds a hotel stuck in a time warp and attempts to drag it screaming and kicking into the 21st century. But she hasn’t reckoned on the Connor’s old fashioned ways.

Saturday 28 June, 7.30pm

The Hotel Inspector is back on another rampage in series three to shake up Britain’s hoteliers and drag under-performing holiday accommodation out of the doldrums, starting tonight at 7.30pm on TV ONE.

With the highest standards and a vicious eye for detail, hotel inspector Ruth Watson will ruthlessly lift the lid on the grotty hotel experience: cheap cotton, inferior interiors and atmosphere more akin to a morgue than a place to holiday.
Her mission is to assess why an establishment is failing to thrive, and then to encourage, cajole and shame the owner into rethinking their service.

In the first episode, hotel scrutiniser Ruth Watson visits The Grand Hotel in Hastings. Peter Mann has owned it for 20 years, but it’s looking anything but grand when Ruth comes to stay. She helps Peter tidy up his tatty hotel and find a way to stand out from the competition, but her tough-talking ruffles his feathers and the pair of them clash on every subject. Can they find a way to work together?

Ruth Watson started out as an inspector for Britain’s Good Food Guide. In 1983, she and her husband bought a Suffolk restaurant, Hintlesham Hall, and transformed it over a period of six years into an award-winning 33-bedroom hotel, with an 18-hole golf course.

In 1990, she launched one of Britain’s first ‘gastropubs’, The Fox and Goose, working in the kitchen for the first 18 months to ensure the food being served was exactly as she wanted.

Since then, she has won awards working as a food writer in magazines and newspapers, written three cookery books (Really Helpful Cookbook, Fat Girl Slim and Something For The Weekend), and bought and refurbished another Suffolk hotel, The Crown and Castle, which has two AA rosettes and a host of other accolades.

Hotel Inspector Saturday 28 July, 7.30pm

Have you ever stayed at a guest-house and thought the service was lousy, the décor outdated or the food preparation simply lazy? The ‘Hotel Inspector’ is on a mission – to scare British hoteliers and drag under-performing holiday accommodation out of the doldrums and up to a standard more befitting for the United Kingdom’s most visited tourist spots (tonight at 7.30pm on TV ONE).

With the highest standards – and a vicious eye for detail, the ‘Hotel Inspector’, Ruth Watson, will ruthlessly lift the lid on the grotty hotel experience: cheap cotton, inferior interiors and atmosphere more akin to a morgue than a place to holiday.
Each episode sees Watson visit the hotels and meet their owners in an attempt to find out where they’re going wrong. She gives her frank opinion on how they’re doing, as well as practical advice gleaned from her own experience – Watson ruffles a few feathers but her blunt approach helps them to achieve some amazing results.

Watson says, “Running a hotel is a complex difficult job, you have to be a combination of personnel manager, accountant, housekeeper, host, advertising exec. Worse, you have to do it 24 hours a day, seven days a week”.

Episode one sees Watson visit the Hanmer Arms, a picturesque hotel, village pub and restaurant nestled on the English/Welsh boarder. The hotel is on the brink of disaster but as she investigates the business, she discovers that the problem may lie not with the hotel but with its eccentric owners.