Lewis

SATURDAY 11th July 8:30PM

Drama

When Richard Scott, a rising star of the Oxford theatre scene is murdered during a student production of The Merchant of Venice, Lewis and Hathaway are struck by the lack of grief amongst the cast, in particular the director who is quick to replace Scott and insists the show must go on.

A note with the body reads ‘Neither a borrower nor a lender be’ which Hathaway identifies as a quote from Hamlet. While interviewing the audience, Lewis and Hathaway discover Scott was an unpopular womaniser who owed money all over Oxford.

The plot thickens when a freelance journalist who has reviewed the show is found murdered following the shows’ opening night party and a note by the body with another quote from Shakespeare.

Meanwhile Hathaway finds himself in a quandary when unexpectedly discovers who killed Lewis’ wife five years earlier in a hit and run accident.

SATURDAY 4th July 8:35PM

Drama

Kevin Whately (The English Patient; Auf Wiedersehen, Pet) returns as much-loved Detective Inspector Robbie Lewis in four new episodes of this fantastic drama set in the beautiful Oxfordshire countryside. The series also stars Laurence Fox (Gosford Park; Elizabeth: The Golden Age) as Lewis’ younger sidekick, Hathaway.

Episode One: Allegory of Love – Lewis investigates the vicious murder of a young barmaid after leaving a professor’s book launch. As Lewis and Hathaway delve deeper into the crime the line between fantasy and reality becomes blurred as the murder begins to mirror the content of the professor’s books.

Guest starring in this episode is Laurence’s father James Fox (Thoroughly Modern Millie, Performance and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory) and Art Malik (The Jewel in the Crown and Holby City).

Saturday 20th September 8.30pm

Did IT teacher Oswald Cooper drug and rape one of his students, Beatrice Donnelly? Lewis and Hathaway are convinced he did, but Cooper appears to have a water-tight alibi.
When Cooper is murdered, Beatrice’s father admits to being at the scene of the crime, and Lewis is obliged to arrest him.
However, the detective’s instincts tell him he has the wrong man, prompting him to look again at those who provided Cooper’s alibi.
Daniela Nardini (This Life) stars in this final episode of Lewis.

Saturday 13th September 8.30pm

When a young man commits suicide in a church, he leaves a note saying ‘On the road to Calvary I stumbled’ on the back of an old leaflet about a religious group, The Garden.

It soon transpires that Hathaway used to be friends with the young man many years ago.

When the body count starts piling up it becomes apparent that Hathaway knows more about this case that he is letting on.

What does Hathaway’s deception signal for his and Lewis’ relationship?

Saturday 6th September 8.30pm

The death of Oxford don RG Cole leads to the shady underworld of unlicensed boxing and the involvement of academic Richard Helm.

Investigations reveal the dead man’s student Jack Roth was involved in a complex love triangle, and when the young man’s rival is found dead in a suspected suicide, Lewis suspects foul play and discovers an old connection to Helm – along with a link to his former mentor, Morse.

Saturday 30th August 8.30pm

Lewis and Hathaway are at Dr Hobson’s birthday party. Uniform police arrive at a house over the road and they use this as a handy excuse to leave.

The house belongs to Dr. Stringer (Neil Pearson), a specialist in the Romantic poets, including the works of Shelley. Dr Stringer believes an intruder came onto his property, but he doesn’t have much to steal other than rare books.

In the basement of the Bodleian Library, a maintenance engineer, Chapman, is found shot in the head. At Chapman’s house, Hathaway finds nineteenth-century books taken from the Bodleian, even though it does not lend out its books. Chapman arouses further intrigue when it’s discovered that he is a member of the local support group, Gamblers Anonymous, organised by Maths Professor Sandra Walters, a close friend of Dr Stringer.

Then Fine Arts student Nell Buckley is also found murdered, and the most significant clue is a hand-written piece of Shelley’s poetry found in her back pocket. When a gun is found in the bed-side drawer of her house-mate and close friend, Philip Horton, the two murders are connected.

Intrigue grows when the detectives find that another house-mate, Jameson, works at the bookmakers where Chapman placed his last bet and is tutored by Walters, the organiser of Chapman’s Gamblers Anonymous group.

When Jameson goes missing, Lewis and Hathaway think he could be the next victim.

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Expiation

Saturday 23rd August 8.35pm

When a North Oxford housewife, Rachel Mallory, is found hanged at home, it appears to be an open and shut case of suicide.
She leaves a devastated husband Hugh, and two young daughters, 8-year-old Anna, and 9-year-old Izzie. Hugh’s business partner, David Hayward and his wife, Louise, were the Mallorys’ closest friends. With two boys of their own, they’re concerned that the girls are protected from the trauma of their mother’s death.
Much to the chagrin of CSI Innocent, Inspector Lewis’ instincts tell him something’s wrong about the suicide verdict. But whether it’s the lack of a note, or the fact that Rachel’s life seemed so perfect, he’s not yet sure.

Saturday 23rd August 8.35pm

When a North Oxford housewife, Rachel Mallory, is found hanged at home, it appears to be an open and shut case of suicide.
She leaves a devastated husband Hugh, and two young daughters, 8-year-old Anna, and 9-year-old Izzie. Hugh’s business partner, David Hayward and his wife, Louise, were the Mallorys’ closest friends. With two boys of their own, they’re concerned that the girls are protected from the trauma of their mother’s death.
Much to the chagrin of CSI Innocent, Inspector Lewis’ instincts tell him something’s wrong about the suicide verdict. But whether it’s the lack of a note, or the fact that Rachel’s life seemed so perfect, he’s not yet sure.

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Final

Saturday 17th May at 8.30pm

When a bright young female student is found murdered in a hotel room, detectives Lewis and Hathaway are drawn into a case driven by celebrity, ambition, scheming and dangerous sexual politics that brings Lewis face to face with his past. The murdered girl, Jo Gilchrist, is one of three Oxford students who each possess an overwhelming ambition to succeed and have grouped together to achieve this, hatching ploys and schemes to further their ambitions. But as Lewis and Hathaway discover, some of these alliances may not be what they seem. Nicky Turnbull, a convicted computer hacker turned best-selling celebrity author, is invited by the group to give a lecture at the University Student’s Union, on face value because of his notoriety. But when he too is killed, Lewis and Hathaway begin to suspect that the two murders may be linked. And could it be that Lewis himself is the intended target, the attempts on his life unwittingly thwarted by the students’ scheming?
The case becomes even more personal when Turnbull’s wife Diane arrives – Lewis’ old classmate and girlfriend. As Turnbull’s widow, she stands to inherit a considerable sum of money, and perhaps the marriage was not so happy in light of his constant casual affairs. Does Lewis trust her anymore; can he believe anything she says? And do the embers of teenage passion still flicker somewhere beneath his policeman’s badge?

Saturday 10th May at 8.30pm

Newcomer Laurence Fox admits he had some catching up to do when approached to be Inspector Lewis’s new partner. He hadn’t watched a single episode of the series forerunner, the long-running Inspector Morse, starring the legendary John Thaw. But the husband of Secret Diary of a Call Girl star, Billie Piper, hasn’t wasted any time hitting his stride. “I wanted action and I got it,” laughs Laurence. “I had to hand out a window in Oxford with a stunt man. It was a dramatic way to end the series.” Laurence believes his character Hathaway is a vocational policeman, despite having begun to train for the priesthood. “He’s obviously into justice and morality. I think he realizes he didn’t want to be a priest. He wanted to do something more proactive, something day-to-day, hands on in a challenging and demanding way.” And how has the relationship between Lewis and Hathaway progressed?
“Lewis is still quite sterile toward him, but he does warm to me a bit during the series, which is a nice thread that goes through it. My character is quite grumpy and aloof too and although they have a few common reference points, fundamentally they are very different people. Hathaway is slightly embarrassed of his learning and he doesn’t want it to come between him and Lewis. Lewis is very much a salt-of-the-earth type, they are such different people, and Hathaway is sensitive to the fact that he is telling someone older and wiser than him stuff that he’s learnt as part of his formal education.
“He’s a modest sort of chap. He doesn’t want to scream and shout about how good he is at various things, which is often the way with talented people. But he tries not to get involved unless he absolutely has to.