Lost in Translation

Sunday April 12 9.00 PM

Series finale! Mike King hits the road to find out about the Treaty of Waitangi, who signed and who didn’t, and sheds new light on events in 1840. Tonight: Treaty carrier Major Thomas Bunbury’s mission was to sign up the South Island – yet he returned with just 27 signatures.

Sunday March 22 at 8.30pm on Maori Television

Mike King hits the road to find out about the Treaty of Waitangi, who signed and who didn’t, and talks to descendants who shed new light on events in 1840. Tonight: William Williams carried the Treaty on the East Coast, along with a freed slave, Piripi Taumata-a-Kura.

Sunday March 15 at 8.30pm on Maori Television

Mike King hits the road to find out about the Treaty of Waitangi, who signed and who didn’t, and talks to descendants who shed new light on events in 1840. Tonight: As well as tensions between Maori and Pakeha, and between tribes, another rivalry was going strong at the time of the Treaty signing – between Protestant and Catholic missionaries. King explores this theme, and in the process finds himself on the trail of a mystery, as he goes in search of a sheet that never returned to Crown hands.

Sunday March 1 at 8.30 PM

Mike King hits the road to find out about the Treaty of Waitangi, who signed and who didn’t, and to talk to descendants who shed new light on events in 1840. Tonight: It’s called the Manukau-Kawhia Sheet, because it was the version of the Treaty signed in these places, but there is a question mark over where the signings occurred.  King tries to get to the bottom of this and explores the possibilities.  From the old mission station at Orua Bay, King takes a water taxi to the place Ngati Whatua believe it took place.  This episode looks closely at a prominent Catholic bishop of the time – Pompallier – an influential man some say may have discouraged some chiefs from signing.

King also goes to Kawhia to meet local historian, Frank Thorne, a descendant of signatory, Te Matenga.

Sunday February 22 at 8.30 PM

Comedian Mike King retraces the journey taken by the Treaty of Waitangi, back in 1840, to find the real story of what happened at the founding of our nation. Tonight: King’s tupuna – Mohi Tawhai – was a well-known Hokianga chief who signed the Treaty. The presenter makes a personal stop at Waima Valley to learn more about the role his ancestor played in the Treaty story.  Also in this episode, the treaty process is thrown into chaos when the man in charge, Captain William Hobson suffers a stroke.

Sunday February 15 at 8.30 PM

Second in a ten-part series about the Treaty of Waitangi that is part-personal odyssey, part-quest for understanding – but not without its funny side. LOST IN TRANSLATION finds comedian Mike King looking for descendants of signatories and people who have ‘neat yarns’ about the signing of the Treaty.  He hits the road, retracing the journey of the nine separate documents that were signed throughout New Zealand in 1840 and now make up the Treaty. In the course of his travels, Mike tells the story of people who, like his great-great-great grandfather, signed the document as well as others who did not.  He’s also gathered personal stories from everyday New Zealanders about the characters and events that surrounded the inception of this country’s founding document.

Sunday February 8 at 8.30 PM

Series premiere! A ten-part series that is part-personal odyssey, part-quest for understanding, and given the host’s background, a great opportunity for a few laughs. Comedian Mike King hits the road to find descendants of signatories and people who have ‘neat yarns’ about the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. He also retraces the journey of the nine separate documents that were signed throughout New Zealand in 1840, and now make up the treaty. In the course of his travels, Mike tells the story of people who, like his great-great-great grandfather, signed the Treaty, as well as others who did not.

CALL FOR KIWI YARNS ON TREATY OF WAITANGI

A new Maori Television show presented by comedian Mike King is looking for descendants of signatories and people who have “neat yarns” about the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi.

LOST IN TRANSLATION is a documentary series that both teaches and tickles us, says Mike – part-personal odyssey, part-quest for understanding and part-excuse for a few laughs.

He is about to hit the road, retracing the journey of the nine separate documents that were signed throughout New Zealand in 1840 and now make up the treaty. In the course of his travels, Mike will tell the story of people who, like his great-great-great grandfather, signed the treaty as well as others who did not.

He’ll also gather personal stories from everyday New Zealanders about the characters and events that surrounded the inception of this country’s founding document and the show will add a further dimension by incorporating stand-up comedy into the mix.

“The Treaty of Waitangi is one of the most contentious issues facing New Zealanders today. There’s a whole heap of reactions to the mere mention of the ‘T’ word in polite company – eyes roll back in heads, veins bulge in necks, people change the subject or excuse themselves from the room,” says Mike.

“Tune in to talkback radio on any day and you’ll hear people at each other’s throats, regurgitating half-truths and perpetuating old myths – arguing their point of view with complete disregard for the facts or the feelings of the other side.”

For an issue that generates so much heated debate and creates so much tension, Mike says it is amazing how little we really know about one of the most explosive chapters in our shared history.

So by presenting an informed, impartial and non-confrontational look at the treaty and getting to know some of the quirky stories about the main players as well as the more unusual ones – including women and Pakeha who signed on the Maori side – Mike hopes that people will fall in love with New Zealand history and want to know more.

LOST IN TRANSLATION will screen on Maori Television in 2008. Filming is scheduled to begin in September this year and the production team are looking for descendants of signatories and people who have some neat yarns about the people and events around the signing of the treaty.