The Tudors

10:25pm Sunday, December 11 on TV One

Following the annulment of King Henry VIII’s (Jonathan Rhys Meyers) marriage to Anne of Cleaves, virtually every man in the court looks on with envy after his marriage to a new teenage wife when The Tudors returns tonight to TV ONE.

However, life isn’t all grand as the new queen for Katherine Howard (Tamzin Merchant). Already snubbed by the King’s daughter, Lady Mary, Queen Katherine must also contend with the arrival of an old friend who knows too many secrets from her past (and is more than willing to use them to her advantage), and her cousin the Earl of Surrey, returning from several years in France to claim his family’s historic place in the monarchy.

Throw in an unprecendented heat wave, and the stage is set for another season of drama, lust, obsession and treachery.

Tudors actor involved in possible suicide attempt

The Tudors actor Jonathan Rhys Meyers has been hospitalised after what is believed to be a suicide attempt. The actor has spent several stints in rehab clinics over the past few years with the latest being earlier this year.

30 Rock’s Morgan in more trouble

30 Rock’s Tracy Morgan is again under fire for borderline jokes during his stand-up routine, this time regarding “retarded” kids and “cripples”. The actor and comic was criticised earlier in the year for his jokes regarding homosexuals.

Being Human actor to guets in Sherlock

Russell Tovey of Being Human has landed a guest role in the second season of Sherlock. The actor, who plays George in Being Human, will feature in the second episode The Hound of Baskerville.

An Idiot Abroad returning in September

An Idiot Abroad has been confirmed to return in September this year in the UK for its second season. Karl Pilkington will again be sent by Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant on a world tour to complete a “bucket list” of activities in various locations.

8:30pm Sunday, October 25 on TV One

Starring Golden Globe-winner Jonathan Rhys Meyers, season three of The Tudors begins with the marriage of Henry (Rhys Meyers, Elvis) to his third wife, Jane Seymour (Annabelle Wallis, True True Lie), tonight at 8.30pm on TV ONE.

In contrast to the scheming upstart Anne Boleyn, Jane is a shy and demure young woman of noble birth, given away on her wedding day by her brother Edward Seymour (Max Brown, Mistresses). Henry’s wife may have changed, but his marital ambition remains constant – siring a male heir to the Tudor Dynasty.

Though the Queen’s pregnancy is cause to rejoice, Henry is faced with mounting threats to his authority from a commoners’ revolt inside England, and an angry Pope determined to stem Protestantism’s rising tide. As attacks on his new church foreshadow trouble for the King, the increasingly powerful Thomas Cromwell (James Frain, Empire) doubles his efforts to crush Catholicism across England.

When Jane dies shortly after giving birth to Henry’s first son, Cromwell looks to capitalise on the tragedy – to find a new wife who will bring with her the alliances needed to stave-off a Catholic invasion – only to be undermined by Henry’s staunchest supporters. And as an anguished Henry struggles to codify his position as the head of the new church, no one is safe from his growing madness.

Jonathan Rhys Meyers says Henry finds himself in a dark place this season and faces a lot of anxiety: “The combination of all the trauma that he’s been through ever since being a child, remember being a child at this time was very, very difficult, he was king at 16 years old, he had all this responsibility, and death was very much a part of his life, it’s very apparent.

“He’s got an illness in his leg, which is affecting his brain because of the poison in the ulcer, so he’s going into that dark place of psychosis, that madness of power, having too much power and having nobody to stop you.”

He says Henry is also getting older and his vanity is becoming affected. “He enjoyed being that young vibrant king, and this is what we wanted to portray in The Tudors.”

Rhys Meyers says he was chosen for this reason: “They could have done this with a different actor, not me. They could have cast somebody who immediately looks like the Holbein painting, but it’s already been done, and done by many other people. The way we’ve done it, is we tried to bring something quite new.”

In playing Henry, he says he wanted to stay away from that wild loush, sort of incredibly flagrant king. “I wanted to bring him as someone who is very very controlled, very mannered. There’s something almost psychotically sort of methodical about the things that he does, especially in season one as the kind of spoilt brat king, because he was, he’s an incredibly spoilt man, probably one of the most spoilt kings in history.”

The new season of The Tudors starts tonight at 8.30pm on TV ONE.

The Tudors Tuesday 30 October, 9.30pm

The season final of The Tudors tonight sees King Henry VIII looking to consolidate his power by appointing Brandon and Norfolk as co-presidents of Council (at 8.30pm on TV ONE). Yet, even as his new chancellor, Sir Thomas More, is cracking down on religious extremists, Henry is persuaded by Anne to consider the merits of Martin Luther’s writings, especially as they pertain to the monarch’s authority over everyone, including the Pope. As More begins his bloody campaign to cleanse England of heretics, the exiled Cardinal Wolsey makes one last attempt to return to power.

The Tudors
Saturday 15 September, 9.30pm

If you missed the first episodes of ‘The Tudors’ on Sunday and Tuesday night, you can catch up with the special screening of all three episodes on TV ONE tonight, at 9.30pm.

Following tonight, ‘The Tudors’ will continue at the weekly time of Tuesday, 8.30pm on TV ONE.

The Tudors
Sunday 9 September, 8.30pm

Divorced, beheaded, died; divorced, beheaded, survived…the tale of the six wives of Henry VIII. England’s most infamous royal, Henry VIII was the super-sized King who consumed food and wives as voraciously as he belched out those who crossed him. He has been depicted throughout history as a rotund man of ruthless appetites; a monstrous ego who eradicated any traditions that got in the way of his ambitions. But the King in the pictures is only half the story; the roly-poly royal eclipses the view of a smart and sexy young man who has been overlooked – until now.

On TV ONE’s ‘The Tudors’, which premieres this Sunday at 8.30pm, viewers will see Henry as never before – young, sexy, intriguing, romantic and infinitely more complex than he’s usually depicted. The series covers the 10 tumultuous years leading up to the King’s first divorce.
At the age of 19, young Henry VIII (Jonathan Rhys-Meyers) succeeds to the throne. Affairs of the state carry little interest for the young monarch, and official matters are left to the powerful Cardinal Thomas Wolsey (Sam Neill), while England’s ruler tends to his own desires. For those in Henry VIII’s inner circle, including Cardinal Wolsey, future second-wife Anne Boleyn (Natalie Dormer), Sir Thomas More (Jeremy Northam), and the Duke of Norfolk (Henry Czerny), staying in the favour of a self-serving King is an arduous and dubious task.

Jonathan Rhys-Meyers says: “The portrait of Henry here is different from the big fat red-haired guy type of image, but it’s very accurate to the historical record. It’s a more attractive and physical Henry that I’m playing, but it’s true.”

Explaining that there was a great deal more to Henry than the pleasure-seeking young buck he presents to others, Rhys-Meyers says, “Henry spent many years, when he was young, sleeping in his father’s [King Henry VII] bed and his father would tell him everything about life in court – who was scheming, how to behave, what to do and not do – so he was very well-schooled. He was also very well-read – although he didn’t have to read himself, others would read it out loud to him. So he was very familiar with cutting-edge thinking and writing of the time.”

For Rhys-Meyers, the compelling thing about his character is how far ahead of his time he was and the complexity of his legacy. “He was a modernist in many senses, even more so than he realised. He founded the Church of England, which the Queen of England still heads today; he introduced divorce into the equation of marriage; and, in his effort to have a son, he gave us Elizabeth I, a kind of founding feminist and one of the most amazing queens the world has ever known.”

‘The Tudors’ sees King Henry VIII testing the boundaries of relationships and pushing his authority to the limits. As a royal, Henry VII appreciates the importance of tradition – but as a restless young man with absolute power, he will not bow to authority. As Rhys-Meyers puts it, “Henry knows you can’t go with anyone’s ideas but your own. And he understands that rules are created by men, and therefore, can be broken.”

The main rule that King Henry VII is remembered for breaking is the previously indestructible bond of marriage. ‘Till death do us part’ would never be quite such an innocently romantic phrase again.

TV ONE will screen a special feature-length premiere of ‘The Tudors’ on Sunday September 9, at 8.30pm, with episode three screening on Tuesday September 11, at 9.30pm. On Saturday September 15, at 8.30pm there will be an encore screening of the first three episodes. The series will then continue in its regular Tuesday 9.30pm timeslot.

The Tudors
Sunday 9 September, 8.30pm

Divorced, beheaded, died; divorced, beheaded, survived…the tale of the six wives of Henry VIII. England’s most infamous royal, Henry VIII was the super-sized King who consumed food and wives as voraciously as he belched out those who crossed him. He has been depicted throughout history as a rotund man of ruthless appetites; a monstrous ego who eradicated any traditions that got in the way of his ambitions. But the King in the pictures is only half the story; the roly-poly royal eclipses the view of a smart and sexy young man who has been overlooked – until now.

On TV ONE’s ‘The Tudors’, which premieres this Sunday at 8.30pm, viewers will see Henry as never before – young, sexy, intriguing, romantic and infinitely more complex than he’s usually depicted. The series covers the 10 tumultuous years leading up to the King’s first divorce.
At the age of 19, young Henry VIII (Jonathan Rhys-Meyers) succeeds to the throne. Affairs of the state carry little interest for the young monarch, and official matters are left to the powerful Cardinal Thomas Wolsey (Sam Neill), while England’s ruler tends to his own desires. For those in Henry VIII’s inner circle, including Cardinal Wolsey, future second-wife Anne Boleyn (Natalie Dormer), Sir Thomas More (Jeremy Northam), and the Duke of Norfolk (Henry Czerny), staying in the favour of a self-serving King is an arduous and dubious task.

Jonathan Rhys-Meyers says: “The portrait of Henry here is different from the big fat red-haired guy type of image, but it’s very accurate to the historical record. It’s a more attractive and physical Henry that I’m playing, but it’s true.”

Explaining that there was a great deal more to Henry than the pleasure-seeking young buck he presents to others, Rhys-Meyers says, “Henry spent many years, when he was young, sleeping in his father’s [King Henry VII] bed and his father would tell him everything about life in court – who was scheming, how to behave, what to do and not do – so he was very well-schooled. He was also very well-read – although he didn’t have to read himself, others would read it out loud to him. So he was very familiar with cutting-edge thinking and writing of the time.”

For Rhys-Meyers, the compelling thing about his character is how far ahead of his time he was and the complexity of his legacy. “He was a modernist in many senses, even more so than he realised. He founded the Church of England, which the Queen of England still heads today; he introduced divorce into the equation of marriage; and, in his effort to have a son, he gave us Elizabeth I, a kind of founding feminist and one of the most amazing queens the world has ever known.”

‘The Tudors’ sees King Henry VIII testing the boundaries of relationships and pushing his authority to the limits. As a royal, Henry VII appreciates the importance of tradition – but as a restless young man with absolute power, he will not bow to authority. As Rhys-Meyers puts it, “Henry knows you can’t go with anyone’s ideas but your own. And he understands that rules are created by men, and therefore, can be broken.”

The main rule that King Henry VII is remembered for breaking is the previously indestructible bond of marriage. ‘Till death do us part’ would never be quite such an innocently romantic phrase again.

TV ONE will screen a special feature-length premiere of ‘The Tudors’ on Sunday September 9, at 8.30pm, with episode three screening on Tuesday September 11, at 9.30pm. On Saturday September 15, at 8.30pm there will be an encore screening of the first three episodes. The series will then continue in its regular Tuesday 9.30pm timeslot.