Waka Huia

Wednesday 19 December 2012, 9.30 pm on Maori Television

Natural history documentaries from throughout the world. Some of the best speakers of Maori gather on the marae at Te Papa Tongarewa Museum in Wellington to debate the future of the Maori language. (Part 2)

Wednesday 12 December 2012, 9.30 pm on Maori Television

Natural history documentaries from throughout the world. Some of the best speakers of Maori gather on the marae at Te Papa Tongarewa Museum in Wellington to debate the future of the Maori language. (Part 1)

Wednesday, 24 October 2012, 9.30 pm on Maori Television

Natural history documentaries from throughout the world.

Wednesday 17 October 2012, 9.30 pm on Maori Television

Natural history documentaries from throughout the world.

Wednesday 19 September 2012, 9.30 pm on Maori Television

Natural history documentaries from throughout the world.

TVNZ is proud to announce a milestone shared by few other New Zealand programmes – the 25 year anniversary of Waka Huia and Tagata Pasifika, and the 20th anniversary of Marae Investigates.

Waka Huia was created in 1987 after the success of the Te Māori exhibition that went around the world. Originally a history programme, Waka Huia tells the stories that were not being passed on to the next generation. Continue reading »

Saturday 31 March, 7.30 pm on Maori Television

Archival documentary series revisiting moments in Maori history. Tonight: A history of Murupara, logging township in the Central North Island.

Sunday 1 April 2012, 6.00 pm on Maori Television

Archival documentary series revisiting moments in Maori history. Tonight: Waka Huia visits Opua in the Bay of Islands to look at some of its recent history.

Celebrating its 21st anniversary this year, TVNZ’s long-running Māori archival series Waka Huia returns with a fresh new look for a new timeslot.

Waka Huia will now screen at 8.30am on Saturday on TV ONE. With a new timeslot comes an exciting new look. Along with its new opening titles and a refresh of its closing credits, Waka Huia 2008 also introduces a vibrant new presenter, Kawariki Morgan.
General Manager of Māori Programmes for TVNZ, Whai Ngata, believes that Morgan is perfect for presenting Waka Huia. “Kawariki Morgan has come through total Māori Language learning from Kohanga Reo and is representative of a growing number of young New Zealanders who identify themselves with Māori stories and see them as a natural part of their Kiwi identity.

“Kawariki is among a growing number of his generation that front television programmes at a national level. He also represents Tainui, Ngati Porou and Ngati Hine tribes, from the Waikato, East Coast and Northern tribal areas.”

Although there are some exciting changes to be seen, the focus of Waka Huia as a means of preserving Māori knowledge remains steadfast. Viewers can expect to see more programmes that cover Māori tribal history, language and customs as well as significant events for Māori and the wider New Zealand community.

Ngata is extremely proud that Waka Huia is celebrating its 21st anniversary this year. “Being on air for 21 years is an enormous achievement, not only for its longevity but also in the way the programme has developed as a record of Māori history, one that is not necessarily accessible in literature. As we approach the 21st year of the programme, we also celebrate the fact that it is accessible on many platforms and in libraries throughout the country.

He believes the show holds an important place in New Zealand media. “Waka Huia has been a training ground for many people in the television industry in past years and I’m sure they’ll all have fond memories of people and places held for posterity in the 800 or so programmes made.”

The first episode will of Waka Huia kick off with an in-depth look at Waitangi 2008.

Saturday 15 March, 8.30am on TV1

Waka Huia
Sunday 25 March, 11am

Since its first transmission in 1987, ‘Waka Huia’ has recorded the voices and images of fluent Maori language speakers. Originally devised as an archival series to preserve the reo and matauranga maori of kaumatua, ‘Waka Huia’ has captured the faces and voices of many kaumatua who are no longer alive. In the process, the show has created a significant audio-visual archive of Iwi and Hapu life and history.

During its long production history ‘Waka Huia’ has travelled thousands of miles to hundreds of marae and special tribal areas. The kaupapa covered have ranged from traditional Iwi and Hapu histories, to the political, social and cultural concerns of the moment.
The first programme of ‘Waka Huia’s 2007 season (today at 11am on TV ONE) looks at the changes to the Waitangi Day celebrations over the years and the effect further changes may have in the future. Nga Puhi elders talk about the possibility of King Tuheitia’s attendance at future commemorations.

Ko te hotaka tuatahi a Waka Huia mo tenei tau kei te titiro ki nga rerekētanga kua pa ki te ra o Waitangi mai ano i nga tau kua hipa ki tenei wa. I korero ano a Waka Huia ki nga kaumātua ō Ngā Puhi mo ō ra ratau tumanako tera pea ka tau atu te Kīngi Māori a Tuheitia ki te ra o Waitangi a nga tau ki mua.